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AboutDupuytren's Contracture

LEARN MORE ABOUT JOHN ELWAY'S EXPERIENCE WITH THE CONDITION

What is Dupuytren’s contracture Video
Spokespersons have been compensated to share their experiences with Dupuytren’s contracture.
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I was diagnosed with Dupuytren’s contracture. It made my everyday activities a challenge. If this sounds familiar, talk with a hand specialist today.

—John Elway

DUPUYTREN’S CONTRACTURE CAN GET WORSE OVER TIME

As it progresses:

Collagen builds up in the hand beneath the surface of the skin and forms a “rope-like” cord on the palm

The cord can tighten, making one or more fingers bend toward the palm so they can’t be straightened

It may limit the range of motion of your fingers

DUPUYTREN’S CONTRACTURE MAY BE MISTAKEN FOR OTHER CONDITIONS (SUCH AS ARTHRITIS OR TRIGGER FINGER)

SPOTTING THE SIGNS

Dupuytren's contracture is part of the progression of Dupuytren's disease, which is caused by a buildup of collagen under the skin of the palm. Before the contracture occurs, you may see the following changes:

Early signs

One hand with nodules or lump in palm of hand

One of the first signs to appear is often a lump (also called a nodule) below the skin of your palm. You may have one or more of these lumps.

Nodules

One hand with pitting or pits in palm of hand

A dimpling of the skin on your palm may appear. This is also called pitting.

Pitting

One hand with cords extending into finger

Thick cords or inflexible bands may also develop under the skin. These cords are caused by collagen that builds up under the skin (the cords are not your tendon). The cords may look “rope-like” and extend from your palm into the finger.

Cords

Contractures

If you develop a “rope-like” cord, it may tighten over time. This tightening may pull (or contract) your finger toward the palm so it can’t be straightened. As the contracture gets worse, your range of motion may decrease.

The joints in your hand that are most commonly affected by Dupuytren’s contracture are:

A hand with Dupuytren’s contracture showing the PIP joint and MP joint

The PIP joints are in the middle of your fingers.

Pip Joint

A hand with Dupuytren’s contracture showing the PIP joint and MP joint

The MP joints are in the base of your fingers, where the fingers meet the palm.

MP Joint

PIP=proximal interphalangeal; MP=metacarpophalangeal

IN CERTAIN SITUATIONS, YOUR DUPUYTREN’S CONTRACTURE MAY BECOME HARDER TO TREAT AS IT BECOMES WORSE

THERE ARE TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR DUPUYTREN'S CONTRACTURE OTHER THAN SURGERY

A NONSURGICAL OPTION

WHAT ARE THE CAUSES OF DUPUYTREN’S CONTRACTURE?

While the exact cause of Dupuytren’s contracture is unknown, common risk factors for the condition include:

Gender

Gender

Dupuytren’s contracture affects men more than women

Age

Age

Symptoms usually start after age 40 but can occur as early as age 20

Ancestry

Ancestry

Dupuytren's contracture is more common in people with Northern European ancestry—but anyone can develop the condition

Family history

Family history

If others in your family have had Dupuytren’s contracture, your risk for the condition may be higher

Smoking

Smoking

People who smoke may have a higher risk of developing Dupuytren’s contracture

ABOUT 16 MILLION PEOPLE IN THE U.S. MAY BE AFFECTED BY THIS COMMON, YET LITTLE-KNOWN HAND CONDITION

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